Office for Foreign Assets Control (OFAC)

The Office for Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) is an agency of the U.S. Department of the Treasury that administers and enforces economic and trade sanctions based on U.S. foreign policy and national security goals. Its primary purpose is to prevent individuals, organizations, and countries from engaging in activities that pose a threat to U.S. interests or violate international norms.

OFAC oversees and maintains lists of specially designated nationals (SDNs) and blocked persons who are subject to various economic sanctions. It enforces sanctions through regulations and licensing requirements, targeting activities such as terrorism financing, narcotics trafficking, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and human rights abuses. OFAC’s authority extends not only to U.S. citizens and companies but also to foreign individuals and entities that conduct business or financial transactions involving U.S. dollars or within the jurisdiction of the United States. Compliance with OFAC regulations is crucial for individuals, businesses, and financial institutions to avoid severe penalties and maintain integrity in international transactions.

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